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uttersanit463

uttersanit463   , 44

from Santa Cruz

Statistics

Children's Nutrition: Guidelines for 9-11 Year Olds



6024301203064829040.jpg



During these 'tween' years your child will develop an appetite that will closely mirror his or her adult eating habits. If you have sons, you will get a preview of the amount of seemingly constant eating he will go through as a teenager. It is at this point that the daily food needs between boysand girlsbegin to diverge. In fact, by the age of 9, girls and boys have varying calorie needs.

As your child's appetite increases, so too should the number of portions served to them from this USDA Food Pyramid:



Grain Group = 6-11 Servings

Vegetable Group = 3-5 Servings

Fruit Group = 2-4 Servings

Milk Group = 2-3 Servings

Meat Group = 2-3 Servings

Fats & Sweets = Use Sparingly[1708]

While the amount of fat required in your child's diet has tapered down from the almost 50% recommended at year one, you still need to include some. At this point, do not give in to the almost constant stream of "what is there to eat". Limit the amount of chips and sweets in your home and encourage healthy snacking.

According to the Daily Calorie Intake model, your nine to eleven year-old GIRL needs the following daily[1698]:

Calories:1,400 to 2,200, depending on growth and activity level.

Protein:10 to 30 percent of daily calories (35 to 105 grams for 1,400 daily calories).

Carbohydrates:45 to 65 percent of daily calories (158 to 228 grams for 1,400 daily calories).

Total fat:25 to 35 percent of daily calories (39 to 54 grams for 1,400 daily calories).

Sodium:1,500 milligrams a day

Fiber: 20to 31 grams a day, depending on daily calories and activity level.

Calcium:1,300 milligrams a day.

Vitamin D:600international units a day.

Your nine to eleven year-old BOY needs the following daily[1698]:

Calories:1,600 to 2,600, depending on growth and activity level.

Protein:10 to 30 percent of daily calories (40 to 120 grams for 1,600 daily calories).

Carbohydrates:45 to 65 percent of daily calories (180 to 260 grams for 1,600 daily calories).

Total fat:25 to 35 percent of daily calories (44 to 62 grams for 1,600 daily calories).

Sodium:1,500 milligrams a day

Fiber:22 to 36 grams a day, depending on daily calories and activity level.

Calcium:1,300 milligrams a day.

Vitamin D:600international units a day.

One of the difficulties of using the calorie counting system is that not all nutrition analyzing software accounts for calcium and vitamin D. Ensure your child is still drinking milk regularly to account for this. If your child's diet has started to stray off path due to school lunches, afternoons at friend's houses and simply because they are taking in more than you can control, consider usingvitamins to make sureyour child is also receiving adequate amounts of iron, zinc, vitamin C, vitamin E and the vitamin B group.

Whether you are looking to use the Food Pyramid System or the Calorie Counting System, you can find more information on portion sizes and the key foods that contain each nutrient on this article,Children's Nutrition: An Overview.

Below are a couple of quick recipes with their nutritional breakdown according to the calorie counting method. Nutritional analysis for these recipes was done usingBigOvensoftware.

Shepherd's Pie6024301214029003276.jpgisdut.com for Shepherd's Pie" border="0"/>

Ingredients for 6 servings:

1 pound Minced lamb

1 1/2 pounds Potatoes

1 large Onion

2 ounces Mushrooms

1 each Bay leaf

2 large Carrots

1 ounce Plain flour

1 tablespoon Tomato pur

1 ounce Butter

4 tablespoons Milk

1/2 pint Lamb or beef stock

2 ounces Cheese

Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees F.

Fry the lamb with onion, mushrooms, carrots and bay leaffor 8 to 10 minutes. Add the flour and stir for a minute. Slowly blend in the stock and tomato pur. Continue stirring, until the mixture thickens and boils. Cover, reduce heat and simmer gently for 25 minutes. Remove the bay-leaf and place in a 1.7 litre (3 pint) oven-proof serving dish.

As the lamb mixtures simmers, cook the potatoes in boiling water for 20 minutes until tender. Drain well, mash with the butter and milk and mix well. Spread on top of the mince mixture and sprinklewith the grated cheese. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes.

Calories: 417

Protein: 19 grams

Carbohydrates: 30 grams

Total fat: 25 grams

Sodium: 250

Fiber: 4 grams

Chicken Stir-fry with Rice

Ingredients for 6 servings:

1 pound Chicken breast, skinless, boneless and cubed

2 stalks Celery, diced

1 large Carrot, diced

1 large Onion, quartered

1 teaspoon Chicken bouillon powder

1 can Chicken broth (or use homemade stock to cut down on sodium)

2 1/2 cups Water

1 1/2 cups Rice

3 tablespoons Soy sauce, low sodium, to taste

2 cloves Garlic, crushed

Mix 2 cups of the water with the broth and bring to a boil. Add rice, bring back to a boil,then cover and reduce heat to simmer until rice absorbs the liquid (about 30 minutes). In wok or large pan heat 1/2 cup of water, bouillon and garlic over med-high heat. Add prepared vegetables and chicken. Stir fry till vegetables are tender and chicken cooksthrough, about 15 minutes. Add cooked rice and stir well. Add soy sauce and mix in.

Calories: 277

Protein: 22 grams

Carbohydrates: 43 grams

Total fat: 2 grams

Sodium:464 grams

Fiber: 2 grams

Baked Apple

Ingredient for 1 serving:

1 each Apple

2 tablespoon Walnuts crushed

1 teaspoon Brown sugar

Peel the top half of the apple, then core it. Fill the hollow centre with crushed walnuts and sprinkle with brown sugar on top. Bake at 375 degrees F for about 45 minutes or until tender. Serve warm.

Calories: 191

Protein: 4 grams

Carbohydrates: 24 grams

Total fat: 10 grams

Sodium: 2 grams

Fiber: 4 grams

French Toast6024301226877142910.jpg

Ingredients for 5 servings:

10 slices Whole-wheat bread

3 large Eggs

1 cup Milk

1 teaspoon Sugar

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wp3zyoOROUo



1 teaspoon Vanilla extract

1/4 teaspoon Salt

1/8 teaspoon Cinnamon

1 pinch Ground nutmeg

Pre-heat a large griddle pan to medium high heat. In a medium bowl, beat the eggs, milk, sugar, vanilla, and salt. Add the cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a shallow dish so you can dip the bread in it.Spray the heated griddle with non-stick spray oil. Dip one slice of bread into the egg mixture, coat both sides. Place the bread on the griddle. Fry on both sides until lightly browned. Serve with butter, fruit or syrup for a special treat.

Calories: 382

Protein: 25 grams

Carbohydrates: 31 grams

Total fat: 17 grams

Sodium: 623 grams

Fiber: 2 grams

Green Beans with Bacon

Ingredients for 6 servings:

2 pounds Green beans

2 slices Bacon

1/4 cup Shallots, minced

3 tablespoons Almonds, chopped

2 tablespoons Brown sugar

1/4 cup Balsamic vinegar

Boil beans in water for two minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Drain well, then set aside. Cook bacon in a small skillet over medium-high heat until crisp. Remove, crumble and set aside. Add shallots to bacon fat in skillet andsautor one minute. Add almonds; saut1 minute. Remove and cool. Add sugar and vinegar; stir until sugar dissolves. Add crumbled bacon. Pour vinaigrette over beans, tossing gently to coat.

Calories: 303

Protein: 15 grams

Carbohydrates: 42 grams

Total fat: 9 grams

Sodium: 570 grams

Fiber: 15 grams

For specific guidelines relevant to other ages and an overview of both nutrition models discussed here, have a look at these articles:

And for more information on adapting your favorite recipes for your kids, have a look at:

Information provided in this article has come fromdifferent sources, including web resources such as the Mayo Clinic and books focusing on children's recipes and nutrition. While much of the data has been researched by nutritionists, some of it is contradictory. The author of this article is not a pediatrician or a nutritionist and recommends that you contact a registered practitioner should you have concerns with your child's health.

http://www.infobarrel.com/Childrens_Nutrition_Guidelines_for_9-11_Year_Olds

Children's Nutrition: Guidelines for 9-11 Year Olds



6024301203064829040.jpg



During these 'tween' years your child will develop an appetite that will closely mirror his or her adult eating habits. If you have sons, you will get a preview of the amount of seemingly constant eating he will go through as a teenager. It is at this point that the daily food needs between boysand girlsbegin to diverge. In fact, by the age of 9, girls and boys have varying calorie needs.

As your child's appetite increases, so too should the number of portions served to them from this USDA Food Pyramid:



Grain Group = 6-11 Servings

Vegetable Group = 3-5 Servings

Fruit Group = 2-4 Servings

Milk Group = 2-3 Servings

Meat Group = 2-3 Servings

Fats & Sweets = Use Sparingly[1708]

While the amount of fat required in your child's diet has tapered down from the almost 50% recommended at year one, you still need to include some. At this point, do not give in to the almost constant stream of "what is there to eat". Limit the amount of chips and sweets in your home and encourage healthy snacking.

According to the Daily Calorie Intake model, your nine to eleven year-old GIRL needs the following daily[1698]:

Calories:1,400 to 2,200, depending on growth and activity level.

Protein:10 to 30 percent of daily calories (35 to 105 grams for 1,400 daily calories).

Carbohydrates:45 to 65 percent of daily calories (158 to 228 grams for 1,400 daily calories).

Total fat:25 to 35 percent of daily calories (39 to 54 grams for 1,400 daily calories).

Sodium:1,500 milligrams a day

Fiber: 20to 31 grams a day, depending on daily calories and activity level.

Calcium:1,300 milligrams a day.

Vitamin D:600international units a day.

Your nine to eleven year-old BOY needs the following daily[1698]:

Calories:1,600 to 2,600, depending on growth and activity level.

Protein:10 to 30 percent of daily calories (40 to 120 grams for 1,600 daily calories).

Carbohydrates:45 to 65 percent of daily calories (180 to 260 grams for 1,600 daily calories).

Total fat:25 to 35 percent of daily calories (44 to 62 grams for 1,600 daily calories).

Sodium:1,500 milligrams a day

Fiber:22 to 36 grams a day, depending on daily calories and activity level.

Calcium:1,300 milligrams a day.

Vitamin D:600international units a day.

One of the difficulties of using the calorie counting system is that not all nutrition analyzing software accounts for calcium and vitamin D. Ensure your child is still drinking milk regularly to account for this. If your child's diet has started to stray off path due to school lunches, afternoons at friend's houses and simply because they are taking in more than you can control, consider usingvitamins to make sureyour child is also receiving adequate amounts of iron, zinc, vitamin C, vitamin E and the vitamin B group.

Whether you are looking to use the Food Pyramid System or the Calorie Counting System, you can find more information on portion sizes and the key foods that contain each nutrient on this article,Children's Nutrition: An Overview.

Below are a couple of quick recipes with their nutritional breakdown according to the calorie counting method. Nutritional analysis for these recipes was done usingBigOvensoftware.

Shepherd's Pie6024301214029003276.jpgisdut.com for Shepherd's Pie" border="0"/>

Ingredients for 6 servings:

1 pound Minced lamb

1 1/2 pounds Potatoes

1 large Onion

2 ounces Mushrooms

1 each Bay leaf

2 large Carrots

1 ounce Plain flour

1 tablespoon Tomato pur

1 ounce Butter

4 tablespoons Milk

1/2 pint Lamb or beef stock

2 ounces Cheese

Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees F.

Fry the lamb with onion, mushrooms, carrots and bay leaffor 8 to 10 minutes. Add the flour and stir for a minute. Slowly blend in the stock and tomato pur. Continue stirring, until the mixture thickens and boils. Cover, reduce heat and simmer gently for 25 minutes. Remove the bay-leaf and place in a 1.7 litre (3 pint) oven-proof serving dish.

As the lamb mixtures simmers, cook the potatoes in boiling water for 20 minutes until tender. Drain well, mash with the butter and milk and mix well. Spread on top of the mince mixture and sprinklewith the grated cheese. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes.

Calories: 417

Protein: 19 grams

Carbohydrates: 30 grams

Total fat: 25 grams

Sodium: 250

Fiber: 4 grams

Chicken Stir-fry with Rice

Ingredients for 6 servings:

1 pound Chicken breast, skinless, boneless and cubed

2 stalks Celery, diced

1 large Carrot, diced

1 large Onion, quartered

1 teaspoon Chicken bouillon powder

1 can Chicken broth (or use homemade stock to cut down on sodium)

2 1/2 cups Water

1 1/2 cups Rice

3 tablespoons Soy sauce, low sodium, to taste

2 cloves Garlic, crushed

Mix 2 cups of the water with the broth and bring to a boil. Add rice, bring back to a boil,then cover and reduce heat to simmer until rice absorbs the liquid (about 30 minutes). In wok or large pan heat 1/2 cup of water, bouillon and garlic over med-high heat. Add prepared vegetables and chicken. Stir fry till vegetables are tender and chicken cooksthrough, about 15 minutes. Add cooked rice and stir well. Add soy sauce and mix in.

Calories: 277

Protein: 22 grams

Carbohydrates: 43 grams

Total fat: 2 grams

Sodium:464 grams

Fiber: 2 grams

Baked Apple

Ingredient for 1 serving:

1 each Apple

2 tablespoon Walnuts crushed

1 teaspoon Brown sugar

Peel the top half of the apple, then core it. Fill the hollow centre with crushed walnuts and sprinkle with brown sugar on top. Bake at 375 degrees F for about 45 minutes or until tender. Serve warm.

Calories: 191

Protein: 4 grams

Carbohydrates: 24 grams

Total fat: 10 grams

Sodium: 2 grams

Fiber: 4 grams

French Toast6024301226877142910.jpg

Ingredients for 5 servings:

10 slices Whole-wheat bread

3 large Eggs

1 cup Milk

1 teaspoon Sugar

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wp3zyoOROUo



1 teaspoon Vanilla extract

1/4 teaspoon Salt

1/8 teaspoon Cinnamon

1 pinch Ground nutmeg

Pre-heat a large griddle pan to medium high heat. In a medium bowl, beat the eggs, milk, sugar, vanilla, and salt. Add the cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a shallow dish so you can dip the bread in it.Spray the heated griddle with non-stick spray oil. Dip one slice of bread into the egg mixture, coat both sides. Place the bread on the griddle. Fry on both sides until lightly browned. Serve with butter, fruit or syrup for a special treat.

Calories: 382

Protein: 25 grams

Carbohydrates: 31 grams

Total fat: 17 grams

Sodium: 623 grams

Fiber: 2 grams

Green Beans with Bacon

Ingredients for 6 servings:

2 pounds Green beans

2 slices Bacon

1/4 cup Shallots, minced

3 tablespoons Almonds, chopped

2 tablespoons Brown sugar

1/4 cup Balsamic vinegar

Boil beans in water for two minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Drain well, then set aside. Cook bacon in a small skillet over medium-high heat until crisp. Remove, crumble and set aside. Add shallots to bacon fat in skillet andsautor one minute. Add almonds; saut1 minute. Remove and cool. Add sugar and vinegar; stir until sugar dissolves. Add crumbled bacon. Pour vinaigrette over beans, tossing gently to coat.

Calories: 303

Protein: 15 grams

Carbohydrates: 42 grams

Total fat: 9 grams

Sodium: 570 grams

Fiber: 15 grams

For specific guidelines relevant to other ages and an overview of both nutrition models discussed here, have a look at these articles:

And for more information on adapting your favorite recipes for your kids, have a look at:

Information provided in this article has come fromdifferent sources, including web resources such as the Mayo Clinic and books focusing on children's recipes and nutrition. While much of the data has been researched by nutritionists, some of it is contradictory. The author of this article is not a pediatrician or a nutritionist and recommends that you contact a registered practitioner should you have concerns with your child's health.

http://www.infobarrel.com/Childrens_Nutrition_Guidelines_for_9-11_Year_Olds

VA Loans and Second Mortgages

VA loans have a variety of uses and flexible options that make them very attractive for first time home buyers. But not every VA loan is a traditional home purchase; some buyers have unique needs that require additional consideration. A second mortgage, also known as secondary borrowing, is one option some qualified VA loan applicants may consider. For this discussion, we'll follow the Department of Veterans Affairs definition of secondary borrowing, which the VA Lender's Guide says is: "...the veteran obtaining a second mortgage simultaneously with a VA-guaranteed first mortgage, both secured by the same property." The VA allows secondary borrowing under specific circumstances. It's not an "all comers" loan option because of the additional financial burden a second mortgage can put on the home owner, but the VA will allow such loan applications when "the veteran is not placed in a substantially worse position than if the entire amount borrowed had been guaranteed by VA". The VA puts additional restrictions on the transaction by requiring documentation about the second loan to include the amount and repayment terms. Second mortgages in these cases must be subordinate to the VA home loan, in what the VA describes as the "junior lien position relative. My team found this article that simply needed to {be discussed with you. My team read it and thought that we need to share it without altering a single word. So here it is.to the VA loan." When applying for the second mortgage, the VA rules allow interest rates on the junior lien to be higher than the VA guaranteed loan, but interest rates on the second mortgage may not exceed industry standards. There area also rules on loan assumption. The VA does not approve of second mortgages that prevent the borrower from selling the home or having the loan assumed. VA regulations allow the home to be sold or have the loan assumed by any credit-worthy buyer; the rule of thumb here is that the second mortgage shouldn't restrict the owner from selling any more than VA rules covering the first mortgage.